Prenatal & Pediatric

Calcium Magnesium

Toddler Drops

Pre-Natal Care

Pre-Natal Care
Pre-Natal CarePre-Natal Care
$29.69
How It Works: 

Pre-Natal Care delivers 22 nutrients for optimal health.

Suggested Use: 

As a dietary supplement, take two capsules daily, preferably with a meal.

Product Specs:
Size/Count: 120
Form: Capsule

WARNING:
ACCIDENTAL OVERDOSE OF IRON-CONTAINING PRODUCTS IS A LEADING CAUSE OF FATAL POISONING IN CHILDREN UNDER 6. KEEP THIS PRODUCT OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. IN CASE OF ACCIDENTAL OVERDOSE, CALL A HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONAL OR POISON CONTROL CENTER IMMEDIATELY.



Proudly manufactured in our NSF® GMP registered facility.

Infant Care™ Multivitamin Drops with DHA

Infant Care™ Multivitamin Drops with DHA
Infant Care™ Multivitamin Drops with DHAInfant Care™ Multivitamin Drops with DHA
$15.12

• 20 mgs Per Serving of DHA, a Nutrient Found in Breast Milk That Helps Support Normal Infant Brain & Eye Development*

How It Works: 

Clinical studies show that DHA, an important nutrient found in breast milk, helps support normal brain and eye development in infants.* Twinlab Infant Care™ drops provide this important nutrient for your baby, as well as 100% of the daily value of ten recommended vitamins. The highest quality vitamin sources, including 100% natural Vitamin E, are used.

Suggested Use: 

Shake well. Fill dropper to 1 ml. Give to baby either directly in their mouth, or mixed in with food or drink. When level of liquid becomes low and filling dropper to 1 ml gets difficult, dispense twice at the 0.5 ml level. After opening, store away from direct light. Refrigeration is not required. KEEP THIS PRODUCT OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN.

Product Specs:
Size/Count: 1 2/3 fl. oz. (50mL)
Form: Liquid
Flavor: Orange

Dr. Greene’s Top 8 Parenting Dos and Don’ts

By Alan Greene, MD, FAAP

Each day I see parents trying their best to do what’s right for their families, but no one has the perfect guidebook that tells parents what to do. Here are the top eight solvable problems that I advise parents to remedy today.

Do… Have confidence in your parenting style.
Don’t… Worry about what your parents or the neighbors or your child's teacher thinks about your parenting style.
Create a parenting style that makes you comfortable and relax.

Do… Create an exercise program for yourself.
Don’t… Skip it because you don’t have the time.
Kids follow our example. If we're not exercising, they won't learn to either. So take care of yourself and teach your kids to do the same.

Do… Take the time to create healthy love foods for your family.
Don’t… Settle routinely for food that isn't helping them build a strong body and mind.
What children eat is vitally important and the foods they learn to love when young will often be their favorites as adults. You can create healthy love foods for them by what you feed them now and give them a life-long gift.

Do… Give your kids a good multi-vitamin each day.
Don’t… Trust that your kids will get all the nutrients they need from their diet alone.
Most kids don't eat 5 servings of fruits and veggies a day. Kids need a good multi-vitamin each day as a safety net to help them round out their nutritional needs.

Do… Stay consistent with your rules.
Don’t… Let whining wear you down.
If you want a child to sleep in her own bed, then letting her sleep in your bed “just this once” is going to make it much harder later.

Do… Think about the things that matter.
Don’t… Pick the wrong things to worry about.
You need to pay close attention to some things, like your kids’ safety. But don't sweat the small stuff even if it means your kids sleep in their street clothes instead of pajamas.

Do… Take advantage of today.
Don’t… Wait until tomorrow to build life-long memories.
Time flies. Plan something every season that your kids will look forward to year after year.

Do… Pay attention to both your perspective and your child's.
Don't… Lose sight of your needs or theirs.

If we focus too much on whatever children want, or too much on what we want, they miss out on learning both to give and receive.

Products

Twinlab® DrGreene™ supplements help you set the stage for your baby’s long-term health even before he is born. Give your child the gift of a nutritional head start by helping them get the right nutrients at the right time, from pregnancy through childhood.

Family Mealtime All for One and One for All

By Alan Greene, MD, FAAP

When I was a child and my family was gathered together for a meal, my father would sometimes look each of us in the eye and say, “All for one, and one for all.” We eagerly repeated this to each other, enjoying the sense of belonging, service, and support. Even when those words weren’t there, the meal together was a tangible expression of our connection. My childhood is now long gone. Life has been full of ups and downs, and it seems ever more complicated and busy. But the simple tradition of family meals has had a long impact. These days, when my family sits down to dinner, my wife and four children around the table, we like to clink our glasses together and declare, “All for one, and one for all!”

It’s hard to overestimate the enormous potential of families sharing meals together. Prepare to be inspired! Even without giving extra effort or conscious thought, family meals are associated with better nutrition, better health, better behavior, and happier children, parents (and grandparents). Experts today are wringing their hands about the obesity epidemic in children and depression in teens; citizens are concerned about violence; educators are distressed by falling school performance. I wish I could write a simple prescription for all families: find a way to enjoy as many meals together, especially at home together, as you can.

Dozens of scientific studies have demonstrated an impressive list of benefits associated with eating together as a family. But some people have correctly pointed out that in the earlier studies it wasn’t clear which was causing which. It made sense to suspect that eating together promoted the benefits, but it was also possible that the association found in the studies was because happier, healthier families were just more likely to eat together. The more recent studies have taken into account other measures of family connectedness and concluded that the benefits we will explore do indeed arise at the table together.

The nutritional benefits alone are dramatic. Getting kids to eat vegetables can be frustrating for many parents. As kids eat more meals at home with their parents, they naturally begin to eat more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and healthy dairy products than their peers do. They are significantly more likely to achieve their nutritional needs. And they eat less in the way of deep-fried foods and drink fewer sugared and carbonated beverages. Increasing the frequency of family dinners is associated with substantially higher intake of several specific nutrients, including fiber, calcium, folate, iron, vitamins B6, B12, C, and E; and with lower average glycemic index; and with lower intake of saturated and trans fats. The benefits are even greater if kids are involved in mealtime preparation and cleaning.

Contrast a family-around-the-table meal at home to a meal at home with the television. The more often that children eat in front of the television, the more likely they are to get more of their calories from fatty meats, pizza, salty snacks, and soda; and the less likely they are to get them from fruits and vegetables. Children in high television-meal families also average twice as much caffeine consumption as do their peers.

And meals out are even worse! The typical kids’ meal in many restaurants is a nutritional wasteland. Fast food meals more than twice a week are associated with increased obesity and type 2 diabetes. Simple family meals are an important strategy to improve nutrition, prevent obesity, and improve health. But they do so much more!

Youth who eat more family meals perform better in school. They spend more time on homework, get better grades, and spend more of their free time reading for pleasure. And they are happier. They are less likely to use alcohol, tobacco, or marijuana. They are less likely to engage in early sexual activity or to have eating disorders. Their self-esteems are higher, on average, and they are less likely to become depressed. Teens who eat many meals with their families are half as likely to think about suicide.

Conscious Preconception

By Alan Greene, MD, FAAP

The “trimester” before pregnancy is an important window of opportunity for a baby's health, whether this is a first pregnancy or a later one. And during pregnancy, the weeks between when conception happens and when a woman knows she is pregnant are especially important - where good nutrition or unhealthy exposures can have their biggest impacts.

But most women don't have a prenatal visit until after they know they are pregnant, when these windows of opportunity have already closed. In light of this, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) made sweeping April 2006 recommendations to improve preconception health and health care. The cornerstone of these recommendations is a pre-pregnancy (and between-pregnancy) check-up, which should be covered by insurance, to help be sure your body is ready to welcome a new baby.

This is an excellent opportunity to a look at specific issues that could affect your next baby before you know you are pregnant, including a review of any prescription and over-the-counter medications you are taking, tests for key illnesses you may not know you have, checking your immunization status, considering possible toxic exposures, and thinking about lifestyle issues such as nutrition, exercise, alcohol and tobacco use. The good news is that making even small changes in your lifestyle can make a big difference for your baby. Perhaps the easiest change is to begin taking a vitamin that is high in folic acid. Folic acid is a nutrient that is important for helping to prevent neural tube defects, when women get at least 400 mcg (0.4 mg) a day. It is found in many foods, such as legumes and dark leafy green vegetables, but most women in the United States only get about 200 mcg from their diets - when 600 mcg or even 1000 mcg would be better. All prescription prenatal vitamins have plenty of folic acid to supplement the diet for healthy women. Many over-the-counter prenatal vitamins contain the proper levels as well. I recommend that all teenage girls and women of childbearing age take a prenatal vitamin or the equivalent. The benefits far outweigh the cost.

Eating for Two - A Guide to Mother’s Nutrition During Pregnancy

By Alan Greene, MD, FAAP

During pregnancy, every ounce of baby's growing body after that very first single cell has come from her mother's own body. The brain, the heart, the muscles are all built from nutrients that were once part of her mother. The baby is quite literally her flesh-and-blood offspring. Nutrients that mom eats during pregnancy, or that she has eaten beforehand, are the exclusive fuel and the only raw material building blocks for the baby's growth. There is nothing else.

This is a special time. A mother and baby together have different nutritional requirements than either of them will ever have alone. Because the mother is the one doing the eating, we'll look at these needs from the perspective of changes needed in the mother's diet.

Sadly, nutrition has not been an adequate priority in mainline medicine. The current 2002 edition of my favorite textbook of obstetrics still contains nutritional advice based on the 1989 Recommended Dietary Allowances. We've learned a lot about nutrition since then, but much of it hasn't filtered into physicians' texts, much less popular parenting books. The data in this series is current as of the most recent Dietary Reference Intakes for each individual nutrient at the time of publication. Prenatal vitamins are designed with these recommendations in mind. Keep in mind that the handful of vitamins and minerals in the tablets are just the Hollywood stars of nutrition. Each organic whole food contains a cast of thousands of micronutrients that we are just beginning to understand. Some of these important “extras” don't even have names yet. A diet rich in the variety of organic foods where the “leading actor” nutrients naturally occur is probably the best diet for pregnancy.

The prenatal vitamin is a spectacular safety net. Getting more of these same nutrients from food is generally great, but taking more of them as supplements is unnecessary and unwise.

What About Seafood?

By Alan Greene, MD, FAAP

For an expectant mom, trying to eat seafood as safely as possible is difficult because the USDA has no classification yet for organic seafood. Therefore, seafood is a double-edged sword. On the one edge, some varieties of fish offer high levels of the fatty acids that help a baby's brain grow well. The omega-3 oils in Pacific salmon, for example, offer powerful benefits to both you and your baby. A 2007 study even suggested that women who regularly eat fish during pregnancy have smarter babies.1 But on the other edge of that sword, a number of species—including tuna, swordfish, Atlantic salmon, and Chilean sea bass—can contain high levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), mercury, and other contaminants.

In the future I would like to see strict government regulations to control the industrial emissions that cause pollution of our rivers, lakes, and oceans. But for now, the fact is that there is a big difference between the benefits and risks of different types of seafood. So I recommend that you choose those with the greatest health benefits, the least contaminants, and the most positive impact on the environment.

The high levels of mercury found in some fish is especially troubling for the unborn baby. Mercury damages a fetus's immune system and kidneys, and interferes with normal brain development. For this reason, despite the value of seafood, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the EPA have recommended that pregnant women avoid shark, swordfish, king mackerel, and tilefish entirely. I agree with this, but would recommend that you also avoid canned tuna, sea bass, Gulf Coast oysters, marlin, halibut, pike, walleye, grouper, orange roughy, rock cod, and largemouth bass while pregnant. And of course, look for local advisories about the safety of fish caught by family and friends in local lakes, rivers, and coastal areas.

Should you eat wild or farmed fish? This is not always an easy choice. Farm-raised fish are fish raised in inland ponds, a room of tanks, or even a net enclosure in a bay, ocean, or lake. Some farmed fish are great for you; some are poor choices, especially during pregnancy. Farm-raised salmon, for example, contains significantly higher concentrations of PCBs, dioxin, and other cancer-causing contaminants than salmon caught in the wild, according to a study of commercial fish sold in North America, South America, and Europe.2 It also tends to contain lower levels of beneficial omega-3s.

1. Hibbeln, J. R., Davis, J. M., Steer, C., Emmett, P., Rogers, I., Williams, C., and Golding, J. Maternal Seafood Consumption in Pregnancy and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Childhood (ALSPAC Study): An Observational Cohort Study. Lancet, Feb. 17, 2007, 369, pp. 531–614.

2. Pianin, E. Toxins Cited in Farmed Salmon: Cancer Risk Is Lower in Wild Fish, Study Reports. Washington Post, Jan. 9, 2004. http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A733-2004Jan8.